The Limited Edition Singer 301

Only 10,000 were allotted in 1951 for Singer's 100th Anniversary!

 

 

Anderson factory original company register A2 log of "NA" Series Register Numbers

The "NA" Series Register Numbers shows that on 25 July 1951 Singer allotted a "Limited Edition" of only 10,000 Singer Model 301 sewing machines, serial numbers NA000001-NA010000, to commemorate Singer's 100th Anniversary, "one year prior" to its Grand Introduction in October 1952. That's all in 1951.

 

Limited Edition Singer 301 that still exist today!

Updated Registry - 14 April 2018

Serial Numbers "NA000001-NA010000" were the only Model 301 sewing machines made in 1951.

"121" Limited Edition Singer 301 sewing machines have been reported out of 10,000.

"104" in Traditional Black and "17" in Soft Beige

"23" with the Blue Centennial Badge and "98" with the Black Band Singer Badge

All 10,000 Limited Edition's have "Short Bed" extensions!

Submit information about your Limited Edition Singer 301

 

Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301 that still exist today!

 Only "23" have been reported out of 1,000.

NA000017 Black - NA000018 Black - NA000019 Black - NA000050 Black

NA000074 Soft Beige - NA000144 Soft Beige - NA000159 Soft Beige - NA000240 Soft Beige

NA000242 Soft Beige - NA000251 Black - NA000268 Black - NA000278 Black

NA000284 Black - NA000302 Black - NA000343 Soft Beige - NA000365 Black

NA000420 Soft Beige - NA000441 Black - NA000522 Black - NA000732 Black

NA000760 Black - NA000857 Black - NA000883 Soft Beige

"15" in Traditional Black & "8" in Soft Beige - All "Short Beds"

Singer Error: NA000268 with Black Band Badge / NA008236 with Centennial Badge

Submit information about your Centennial Singer 301

 

Singer Celebrates 100th Anniversary with New Slant-needle Sewing Machine

The "anniversary model" on display is the new Slant-needle "Singer Model 301".

The date of August 12th is used in celebrating Singer's Anniversary, as marked by the issued patent of the first Singer sewing machine by Isaac Merritt Singer on August 12, 1851. For Singer's 100th Anniversary they introduced the new Slant-needle "Singer Model 301" that would revolutionize the sewing-machine-of-tomorrow with a design to make home sewing easier and more convenient.

The original Singer sewing machine along with the new Slant-needle "Singer Model 301", anniversary model, were displayed at the exhibition of new and old Singer sewing machines in New York from 16-30 September during the 100th Anniversary of the patenting of the first Singer sewing machine observed by Singer Manufacturing Company and its employees.

The exhibition was than on display during the month of November for the 100th Anniversary being celebrated at Singer's South Bend, Indiana factory, where they crafted wood cabinets for Singer sewing machines. The South Bend factory gave tours to celebrate the anniversary.

The "anniversary model" consisted of a "Limited Edition" of only 10,000 Slant-needle "Singer Model 301" sewing machines that were allotted to commemorate Singer's 100th Anniversary, 1851-1951, one year prior to its Grand Introduction in October 1952.

 

Special Edition - Limited Edition - Anniversary Edition

Throughout Singer's history special badges were installed on assorted Singer Model sewing machines for major events: A Century of Progress -1933 World's Fair in Chicago, A Century of Progress - 1934 Chicago Centennial, 1936 Texas Centennial Exposition, 1939 Golden Gate Exposition - San Francisco, 1940 Golden Gate Exposition - San Francisco, 1951 Centennial - 1851-1951 - A Century of Sewing Service, 1954 State Fair of Texas and 1964-65 New York Worlds Fair, maybe more worldwide.

Vintage groups, book writers and some collectors call any Singer sewing machine with a special badge either a "Special Edition", "Limited Edition" or "Anniversary Edition". Just because a Singer sewing machine has a special badge does not make it any kind of edition but instead it is used to designate special years and events. This is not to say that it didn't increase value, as it does, providing the machine was made in the year of the special badge and event. Don't get fooled by this terminology.

  • "Special Edition" implies there is extra material of some kind included or a new version of something that differs from its original format or design. (Some other kind of changes in addition to a Special Badge)

  • "Limited Edition" is an edition of something that is limited to a relatively small number, usually a total quantity of 1,000 or less, but can be higher, that will latter become scarce, hard to find or rare. They will have a numbering system to verify how many were actually made and sold.

  • "Anniversary Edition" is something "new" to commemorate an anniversary and has a limited quantity.

Prior to Singer's 100th Anniversary there has never been a "Special Edition", "Limited Edition" or "Anniversary Edition" of any Singer sewing machine. Singer installed special badges as a marketing incentive to either introduce a new sewing machine or sell older sewing machines during major events across the country and why they had no numbering system to verify how many were actually made or had special badges.

During Singer's 100th Anniversary the new Slant-needle "Singer Model 301" was on display as the "Anniversary Model" at the exhibition of new and old Singer sewing machines held in New York and South Bend, Indiana.

The "Singer Model 301" is the only "Limited Edition" and "Anniversary Model or Edition" in Singer's 100 year history. The "Centennial 301" in traditional black is even more special because it has unique changes that can be considered a "Special Edition".

Don't get fooled by vintage groups, book writers, or even collectors with this terminology.

 

The Making of a Super-Rare Sewing Machine

Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301

With 100 years of making and selling sewing machines Singer was clever at marketing but they were also very clever and new exactly what it took in making a Super-Rare sewing machine and they did just that. Collectors know that all it takes is a small change in details that makes an item Super-Rare, and so did Singer..

To commemorate the 100th Anniversary Singer allotted a "Limited Edition" of 10,000 Slant-needle Singer Model 301 sewing machines to be manufactured at the Anderson factory. Singer knew that a "Limited Edition" is an edition of something that is limited to a relatively small number, usually a total quantity of 1,000 or less but can be higher, that will later become scarce, hard to find or rare and has some kind of numbering system to verify how many were actually made and sold.

Of the 10,000 Limited Edition Singer 301 sewing machines Singer decided that the first 1,000, NA000001-NA001000, would have the Centennial Badge. There would be 500 Centennials in "Traditional Black" with gold "Paperclip" decals and 500 in "Soft Beige" with no decals. This would ensure by industry standards that the "Centennial Singer 301" was a true "Limited Edition".

Bed-Arm Decal

Singer already planned for the new Slant-needle Model 301 in the traditional black to have "Paperclip" decals. A "Paperclip Transfer" comes complete on one transfer sheet or decal set. Singer always had matching transfer sets or decal sets on their sewing machines but what they did was truly out of the ordinary. On all the traditional black Centennial 301's Singer installed the "Celtic Chain" decal on the back of the bed-arm that did not match the "Paperclip" decal in the center of the bed.

The printing department, located at the Elizabeth factory, is where all the literature is printed, along with badges and transfer sets used for ornamenting the machine heads. When Singer decided that only the first 1,000 Singer 301's manufactured would have the Centennial badge the Elizabeth factory sent 1,000 Centennial Badges and 1,000 "Paperclip" transfer sets that included 1,000 "Celtic Chain" transfers for the bed-arm decal to the Anderson factory.

In reality, the Anderson factory only needed 500 transfer sets because 500 soft beige Centennials had no decals. This now explains why the other 500 transfer sets with the Celtic Chain decal on the bed-arm were found randomly between serial numbers NA001000-NA010039, the majority having matching Paperclip decals.

In 1951, the Singer Model 201-2 had matching "Paperclip" decals and the 221 Featherweight had matching "Celtic Chain" decals. Singer could have easily used either decal sets on the new Slant-needle sewing machine.

The Model 201-2 was full size and Singer's top of the line sewing machine. The Model 221 Featherweight was portable and Singer's best selling sewing machine. It is very clear that Singer purposely made this unique change as a clever way of saying for their 100th Anniversary that the new Slant-needle Singer Model 301 sewing machine was like having both the Singer Model 201-2 and 221 combined but even better.

The "only" sewing machine that's a cabinet and a portable model all in one!

The Best Sewing Machine Ever Made! The Worlds Finest Straight Stitch Sewing Machine!

The Singer 301 was undoubtedly the "Pinnacle" of all Singer Straight Stitching sewing machines!

Celtic Chain Decal - Serial Numbers NA000001-NA001000

Paperclip Decal - Serial Number NA001001-NA130000

Prism Decal - Serial Number NA130001 to NB075000

 

Different Size Centennial Badges

Singer did another unusual change - The Centennial Badge for the Singer 301 is larger in circumference than all the other Singer Centennial Badges. Only 1,000 Singer Model 301 sewing machines would have this larger badge compared to all the other Singer model sewing machines, over 1 million, that had the smaller centennial badge. This makes the Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301 even more special than any other Singer model sewing machine that has a Centennial Badge.

                                       

                        500 in Traditional Black       500 in Soft Beige        Smaller Badge & Mounting Pins

Look carefully at the Centennial Badge on the right. This is the same size badge used on all Singer Model sewing machines with the Centennial Badge and does not fill in the border casting on the 301. Why this Centennial 301 has the smaller badge is unknown and is incorrect.

 

Bed Extension

In addition to the larger Centennial Badge and the Bed-Arm Celtic Decal the "Bed Extension" was unusual. The Centennial 301's had 3 different styles of short-bed extensions. After the last Centennial 301 Singer installed the short-bed extension, regardless of color, that is found on mostly all Singer 301/301A's starting with Serial Number NA001001 to the end of production.

                

Common Style 301/301A Short-Bed Extension starting with Serial Number NA001001

SIMANCO U.S.A. 170027

Singer could have easily installed the common style short-bed extension as it was already manufactured but instead they installed one of three different styles on the Centennial 301's. Ironically, 2 styles have no "Part Number" at all and this is very unusual because Singer marks all their parts. Was this another clever way of Singer making the Limited Edition "Centennial" 301 even more unique and special?

        

Two Styles of the Traditional Black Centennial 301 Short-Bed Extensions

No Part Number or SIMANCO U.S.A.

   

This Style was found on the Soft Beige and some Traditional Black Centennials

SIMANCO U.S.A. 17

 

Three Unique and Unusual Detail Changes

We now have three very unique and unusual detail changes that clearly shows Singer knew exactly what they were doing thus making the new Slant-needle sewing machine in traditional black truly unique, special and "Super-Rare".

In Singer's 100 year history they created the first and only true "Limited Edition" sewing machine making all 500 in traditional black the "Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301", all being Super-Rare today.

It is also an "Anniversary Model or Edition" because it was a "new" sewing machine to commemorate the 100th Anniversary and can also be called a "Special Edition" because of the unique detail changes.

 

The Super-Rare "Centennial 301" is a Limited Edition, Anniversary Edition and Special Edition, all in one!

Out of 500 only 15 are known to exist today!

 

Motor "Circle S"

The same .53 amp motor was used on all 301's and 301A's but look closely at the picture below from a 1951 Limited Edition Singer 301. It has what they call a "Circle S", a "S" inside of a gray circle, located on the left side of the data plate. All 10,000 Limited Edition Singer 301's made in 1951 have this data plate.

          

                                       1951 Limited Edition Singer 301                       "Circle S"

 

The motor below has what they call a "Red S", "Singer Sewing Machines" is written inside the "Red S" with a lady sewing on a sewing machine, located in the center of the data plate. The change from "Circle S" to "Red S" occurred after serial number NA050000 in 1952. For more information go to "About the 301" webpage.

           

                                1952-1957 Singer 301 & 301A Data Plate                  "Red S"

 

Foot Controller "Circle S"

With the "Circle S" on the motor data plate the same "Circle S" is also located on the Foot Controller data plate for all Limited Edition Singer 301 sewing machines. It's like a matching electrical set.

 

There were 2 foot controllers:

  • Part No. 194828 was issued with the LE Singer 301-1, for cabinet use. It consists of two separate wires. The first wire is called the line lead: one end has the electrical plug and the other end has the three pin female terminal housing. The 2nd wire is the controller lead: one end is connected to the foot controller and the other end has the 2-Pin male plug. You can easily tell this is for cabinet use, foot or knee.

       

 Part No. 194828 - 2 wires for cabinet use

 

  • Part No. 194584 was issued with the LE Singer 301-2, with trapezoid carry case. It consisted of only 1 wire, as we call it, with the foot controller on one end connected to the three pin female terminal housing and than connected to the wire with the electrical plug. You can easily tell this is for portable use.

          

Part No. 194584 - 1 wire for portable use

 

With the electrical wires well over 60 years old the original wire is brittle and is a electrical and fire hazard. Most of these wires have been changed over the years and you could have a 194828 foot controller with only one wire because you use it as a portable. This is not a problem and the first concern should be safety.

 The motor and foot controller data plates should both have the "Circle S" emblem!

 

Singer Badge Boarder Casting

All Limited Edition Singer 301's will have a border casting around the Singer Badge, a protruding and more dignified appearance. The Singer 301A does not have a border casting, a simple flat looking appearance.

Take a look at the difference:

 

Green Cover Instruction Manual!

This is the first Singer 301 Instruction Manual. Copyright 1935, 1936, 1938, 1940, 1947, 1948, 1950 and 1951: (1051), 60 pages. The revised date of (1051) or October 1951 corresponds exactly when the very first Limited Edition Singer 301 were being sold in Singer Sewing Centers in October 1951. It is extremely "Super-Rare" and another form of authenticity as they were only issued with the Limited Edition Singer 301. For more information on instruction manuals go to "About the 301" webpage.

Limited Edition Singer 301 Green Cover Instruction Manual

 

Singer Trade-In Allowance

Why such low numbers of the "Centennial 301" and "Limited Edition 301" sewing machines?

During the years 1855 to 1856 Edward Clark instigated three programs that benefited the Singer Sewing Machine Company tremendously and can be credited for catapulting the company into unbelievable success.

The first concept was to introduce a sewing machine expressly designed for home use. The original machine was to bulky and a heavy machine at 125 pounds made of cast-iron. In 1856, Singer produced the "Turtleback" machine, the first machine manufactured expressly for family use.

The second concept, was the trade-in program, that addressed the public's distrust of a working sewing machine. Those who were disenchanted with their current machine were leery of investing in a new machine. When Singer offered to trade in a customer's old machine, regardless of make or condition, more people were willing to try a new Singer machine. To help offset the cost of owning a new Singer machine, Singer offered a fifty-dollar allowance for the customer's old machine towards the purchase of a new Singer machine. The used machines were promptly destroyed, eliminating any hope of a second hand market.

The trade-in allowance continued up to the 1960's with Singer Sewing Centers having a press in the back room that would crush every trade and later melted down at the factory.

The third concept dealt with the fact that a sewing machine sold for a little over one hundred dollars, which was a fifth of the average American's yearly income. The installment buying or rent-to-own program, introduced in late 1856, proved to be one of Clark's most ingenious marketing plans.

Clark proved to be a marketing genius with the made-for-home sewing machines, trade-in allowances, and the rent-to-own programs.

In 1954, the Japanese started importing into the United States a zig-zag machine built by Brother International Corporation and in 1956 Singer introduced the Singer 401 Slant-o-Matic zig-zag sewing machine. Everyone simply wanted a zig-zag sewing machine that also sewed a straight stitch. A lot of customers took advantage of Singer's trade-in allowance for the new Singer machine.

With many Singer 301's destroyed as trade-ins, mostly soft beige, along with owners that discarded them for one reason or another, this caused the original 1,000 "Centennial 301's" and the 9,000 "Limited Edition 301's" being reduced in numbers and explains why they are so hard to find today.

 

Authenticity of your Limited Edition Singer 301

If you are the proud owner of a Centennial or Limited Edition Singer 301 you can get a Singer Certificate that has your Name, Serial Number and Year of Issue of 1951. http://www.mysingerstories.com/ Out of 1 million NA serial numbers yours would be the only correct year that the Singer 301 was actually made.

The Singer Sewing Company - Anderson Factory - NA Series Register Numbers proves beyond a doubt that your Limited Edition Singer 301 was in fact allotted on 25 July 1951 to be manufactured. Out of 1 million NA serial numbers only 10,000 were allotted to be manufactured in 1951. Download your .pdf file here:

These 2 documents will undoubtedly verify the authenticity of your Centennial Year Limited Edition Singer 301 sewing machine.

 

 The Crown Jewel of the Super-Rare!

Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301

Only 500 were made in "Traditional Black" with the "Celtic Chain" decal on the back of the Bed-Arm.

Out of 500 only 15 are known to exist today!

 

          

Super-Rare and Highly Collectable

(The Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301 in Traditional Black is Super-Rare & Highly Collectable)

Graham Forsdyke states, regarding sewing machine value:

The "Super-Rare" will always appreciate whatever the condition.

For the Centennial Year celebration over 1 million Singer model series 15, 66, 99, 128, 201, and 221 sewing machines had Centennial Badges and most of them with serial numbers dating from 1947-1950, although some were made in 1951. Singer kept no records on any of these Centennial's because the Centennial Badge was a marketing gimmick simply to reduce old overstock inventory. That is the Truth. All models with a 1947-1950 serial number were made in those years and will be listed on Singer's "Register of Serial Numbers", there is no way of getting around this, sorry.

This left much doubt if they are considered a "True" Centennial.

  • A "True" collectable item must happen in the year it is collectable, in this case 1951. A "True" Centennial Singer sewing machine is any Singer model sewing machine that was undoubtedly manufactured in 1951  and has the 1851-1951 Blue Centennial Badge, period.

Of all the Singer Model Series Centennials the "Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301" is the only Singer Model sewing machine that has a serial number sequence, NA000001-NA001000, 500 in Traditional Black and 500 in Soft Beige.

 

1851-1951 Blue Centennial Badge - Traditional Black - Celtic Chain Decal on Bed-Arm.

Extremely Super-Rare - Very Special - Highly Collectable - Almost Impossible to Find.

The Singer 301 has the same number as the stitch it sews - Stitch Type 301

The Super-Rare "Centennial 301" is a Limited Edition, Anniversary Edition and Special Edition, all in one!

 

What is the worth of a Super-Rare Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301:

In order to understand the worth of a Super-Rare Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301 the kinds of value must be taken into consideration:

  • Historical Value: A "Limited Edition" of only 1,000 were allotted to commemorate the 100th Anniversary, all with the 1851-1951 Centennial Badge. 500 in Traditional Black and 500 in Soft Beige.

  • It was the "anniversary model" during the 100th Anniversary in New York and South Bend, Indiana.

  • The only Singer sewing machine that is a Limited Edition, Anniversary Edition and Special Edition all in one.

  • The 1st Slant-Needle sewing machine, making it easier to see what your sewing.

  • The 1st and Only sewing machine that's a Cabinet and Portable model all in one. Full-sized, Full-fledged cabinet machine - that you can use as a portable. You can raise the handle and lift the machine out of the cabinet and carry it anywhere.

  • The 1st family sewing machine to sew up to 1,600 stitches per minute.

  • The only sewing machine that has the same number as the stitch type it sews - Stitch Type 301.

  • Changed from the Nostalgic appearance of the past to a modern-streamline design, locomotive in appearance, that is still seen today. The Singer Model 301 gave birth to modern sewing machine design.

  • Decorative Value: Being the 1st Slant-Needle sewing machine shows the period style during the 100th Anniversary. The Traditional Black color with gold Paperclip decals has the unmatched Celtic Chain decal located on the bed-arm, a very rare occurrence, instead of the center Paperclip decal.

  • Collector Value: Only 500 Traditional Black Centennials have the Blue Centennial badge of 1851-1951 with an extremely low quantity that exist today.

  • Utilitarian Value: The Singer 301 was known as The World's Finest Straight Stitch Sewing Machine and as The Best Sewing Machine Ever Made. 

  • Sentimental Value: Most owners of this super-rare sewing machine do not sell them, instead they pass from generation to generation. The personal and emotional association is greater than any other value.

  • Condition Value: The Super-Rare will always appreciate in value no matter what the condition.

  • Monetary Value: The value of this super-rare sewing machine is not fixed. It holds every kind of value and them some. Monetarily, on any given day, it is what the seller asks and what the buyer is willing to pay.

Most collectors today still do not know the significance of the Super-Rare Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301 as it holds every kind of value imaginable.

Owners of a Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301 in traditional black with gold decals will usually not even consider selling. These owners will most likely have the super-rare Green Instruction Manual, 301 accessories and because Centennials are short beds you may find an owner with the original No. 40 Queen Ann cabinet or another style cabinet sold in 1951, this increases the value significantly. If you are lucky to find an owner to sell be prepared to pay whatever the owner feels it is worth and I assure you they are worth more than you think.

How Super-Rare is it... Ask any Antique/Vintage Sewing Machine Collector if they have personally seen at least one Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301 and I can almost guarantee they will all say "No". They are virtually impossible to find but happy hunting and maybe you will be the next lucky owner of a "Centennial' Singer 301.

 Submit information about your Centennial Singer 301

 

Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301

Only 500 in Soft Beige (No Decals)

           

Rare and Collectable

The Soft Beige "Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301" are considered Rare and Collectable but because of the color and modern appearance, without decals, they hold less value than in traditional black with decals.

Submit information about your Centennial Singer 301

 

Limited Edition Singer 301

Rare and Collectable

There were 9,000 "Limited Edition Singer 301" sewing machines, serial numbers NA001001-NA010000, in both traditional black (4,500) and soft beige (4,500) all with the new Black Band Singer Badge.

The majority of the traditional black "Limited Edition Singer 301" have the Paperclip decal on the back of the bed-arm but there are 500 that have the Celtic Chain decal and are worth more than with the Paperclip decal. They are considered Rare and Collectable as a "Limited Edition" but worth less than the "Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301" because it did not have the Centennial Badge.

The soft beige "Limited Edition Singer 301" are considered Rare and Collectable but because of the color and modern appearance, without decals, they have less value than the traditional black "Limited Edition Singer 301".

Submit information about your Limited Edition Singer 301

 

Singer 301/301A

1952-1957

 

Collectable

The Singer 301/301A made from 1952-1957 are all collectable being the 1st slant-needle sewing machine, The Worlds Finest Straight Stitch Sewing Machine and The Best Sewing Machine Ever Made. Many owners will not settle for just one of Singer 301 or 301A but will have more than one or several.

Not to long ago you could buy a Singer 301 for under $100 on eBay but today they sell in the $200 to $300 range, sometimes higher, and the prices will keep increasing. The good news is they can still be found at flea markets, goodwill, and estate sales at very low prices. Everyone that sews on a Singer 301 wants one without question and should be part of any sewing machine collection.

 

"NB" Singer 301A

 

Collectable

In 1956, it was the beginning of the "NB" serial numbers and the new two-tone color, "Oyster-White and Solid Beige", and for unknown reasons Singer allotted one last batch of 10,000 Singer Model 301A sewing machines in traditional black with serial numbers NB065000-NB075000. Interestingly, this is the same exact number as the 10,000 Limited Edition 301's in 1951.

Out of 200,000 "NB" serial numbers the very early serial numbers were "Soft Beige" but the majority are "Oyster-White and Solid Beige" and 10,000 in traditional black. They would be the last of the Singer 301A sewing machines and the last slant-needle model sewing machine made in Traditional Black. They are considered collectable with slightly more value than the 1952-1957 Singer 301 or 301A.

Submit information about your "NB" Limited Edition Singer 301A

 

The Limited Edition Singer Model 301 - Timeline

 

  • In 1950, Singer built a new plant in Anderson, South Carolina to manufacture the slant-needle sewing machines. Although the plant officially opened in 1950 production did not start until the end of July 1951.

  • On 27 March 1951, Singer's Elizabethport factory located in Elizabeth, New Jersey manufactured a pilot run of 30 Singer 301's with the following serial numbers: AK257721-AK257750. These 30 machines went through testing and inspection as it was an entirely new sewing machine.

  • On 29 May 1951, Elizabeth, NJ issued "NA" serial numbers, NA000001-NA999999, for the Singer 301, 301A, 401A, and 403A. Yes, 1 million serial numbers! The 301, 301A, 401A and 403A, all with NA serial numbers, were not manufactured until 1952, 1953, 1956 and 1958, respectively.

  • In June 1951, Singer plans for a limited edition of the new Slant-needle Singer Model 301 to commemorate the 100th anniversary.

  • On 25 July 1951, the original Company register number log book for the Anderson factory located in Anderson, South Carolina shows that 10,000 serial numbers, NA000001-NA010000, were allotted to be manufactured. They were the only Model 301 sewing machines allotted in 1951.

 

  • From 25 July-September 1951 was when the Limited Edition of the Singer 301 were being manufactured at the Anderson factory. They were shipped to Singer Sewing Centers in one box containing 2 brand new Singer 301 sewing machines.

  • 16-30 September 1951, the 100th Anniversary of the patenting of the first Singer sewing machine was observed by Singer Manufacturing Company in New York with 9,400 Singer employees. The new Slant-needle Singer Model 301 was displayed as the "Anniversary Model" at the exhibition of new and old Singer sewing machines.

  • November 1951, the exhibition of new and old Singer sewing machines was now being observed at the South Bend, Indiana factory. The factory also gave tours to celebrate the 100th Anniversary.

  • From October-December 1951 the "Centennial Singer 301" and "Limited Edition Singer 301" sewing machine were being sold in selected Singer Stores. This corresponds with the first Green Cover Instruction Manual, copyright 1951, (1051), October 1951. Original owner purchase receipts prove they were in fact purchased from October-December 1951 all with the Green Cover Instruction Manual, copyright 1951.

Singer 301 & 301A Timeline

  • January 1952, manufacturing begins for the Singer Model 301, serial numbers NA010001-NA185750, allotted to be manufactured at the Anderson factory throughout 1952.

  • October 1952, exactly 1 year from when the "Centennial Singer 301" and "Limited Edition Singer 301" were sold in October 1951 was the Grand Introduction of the new Singer Model 301 Slant-needle sewing machine in October 1952. Original owner purchase receipts verify that serial numbers starting from NA010001 were being purchased in November 1952.

  • 1953, manufacturing begins for the Singer Model 301A, serial numbers starting with NA185751. The suffix "A" was added to the 301 Model Tag, 301A, to signify it was made in Anderson, South Carolina.

  • 1955, last of the Model 301A with "NA" serial numbers ending with NA500000.

  • 1956, beginning of the Model 301A with "NB" serial numbers starting with NB000001.

  • 1957, last of the Model 301A with "NB" serial numbers ending with NB200000.

  • 1958, remaining inventory still being sold and its replacement, the Singer Model 404, was introduced.

  • 1959, the Singer Model 301 & 301A was officially removed from the Singer Price List.

 

Singer 301 Sales Contract 1952

Singer 301, Black, Serial Number NA012593

Here is a Singer Sales Contract from a very early Singer 301, serial number NA012593, made in 1952 and was purchased on 13 Nov 1952 after the Grand Introduction of the Singer 301 in Oct 1952. This document is very important as it supports the fact that only 10,000 Limited Edition Singer 301 were made and sold in 1951.

This Singer 301-1-65 was Black with a mahogany cabinet and stool for $336.50. Buttonholer attachment was $9.95 and the Zigzag attachment was $4.95. Total 351.50 +$10.54 sales tax = $361.94 in 1952. All the early serial numbered Singer 301's purchased from November & December 1952 were issued with the Black Cover Instruction Manual with a Copyright date of 1951 and 1952, Revised (652), 64 pages.

If you have a "Limited Edition or Centennial Singer 301", please submit your information!

 

 

My Personal Singer Collection

 

        

 

"Serial Numbers: NA000001-NA010000"

 They are all considered "Limited Edition Singer 301" sewing machines,

 with the Blue Centennial Badge or the new 1951 Black Band Badge.

If it has a "Centennial Badge" it can also be called a "Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301".

Instead of a Centennial Badge you may have the Centennial Singercraft Guide #121079!

They were all issued with the "Green Cover" Instruction Manual!

 

                                  

Centennial Badge       Black Band Badge         Singer 301 Manual       Centennial Singercraft Guide

 

 

Super-Rare

Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301

NA000018 - NA000441 -NA000760

The Crown Jewels of my Collection are the 18th, 441st and 760th Centennial Singer 301.

This is the 1st pictures on the Web of a Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301

 

The Centennial Singer 301 Badge

NA000018 and NA000760

The 18th Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301

The "Celtic Chain" Decal does not match the "Center" Paperclip Decal

The 441st Limited Edition "Centennial" Singer 301

NA000018

NA000441

NA000760 

 

Motor with Circle-S - also have the Circle-S foot controller - and Green Instruction Manual

 

Here is my "Limited Edition Singer 301" purchased on 12 December 1951!

Serial Number NA009643 with the new 1951 Black Band Badge

When I purchased this Limited Edition Singer 301 it came with a No. 40 Queen Anne Cabinet and a Singer Chest. There was also a Singer warranty showing the purchase date and an index card showing everything that came with the machine and prices. It is a condition Grade 9, almost like the day it left the factory.

 

One of the last Singer 301's made in 1951 - 9,643 out of 10,000

 

What this brand new "Limited Edition Singer 301" cost in December 1951:

  • Black Singer 301: $229.50
  • Queen Ann #40 Sewing Cabinet: $74.00
  • Sewing Stool: $26.00
  • Sewing Chest 4 Drawer: $41.25
  • Singer Buttonholer #160743: $9.95
  • Centennial Singercraft Guide: Free
  • Tax: $11.57
  • Total: $392.27
  • Less Singer Discount: -$45.00
  • Grand Total: $347.27 on 12 December 1951 (Christmas Gift)
  • Included with 301 Sewing Machine: Green Cover Instruction Manual, Wiring Harness w/Foot Pedal, Metal Bobbin, Shuttle Case #45751, All Purpose Pressure Foot #170071, Seam Guide w/Screw, Singer 301 Sewing Machine Attachments #160623 - Box Includes: Multiple Slotted Binder #160624, Edge Stitcher #160625, Adjustable Hemmer #160626, Gather Foot #160628, Ruffler #160629, Black Felt Spool Washer, Black Screwdriver #25537, Tension Screwdriver #120378, 4 Bobbins, 2 Packs 15x1 Needles

The price of a Limited Edition Singer 301 was $229.50 in 1951. During the Grand Introduction in October 1952 it remained at $229.50. In 1958 the price was reduced to $169.90 to sell off the remaining inventory.

    

Singer 5 Year Warranty 12 December 1951

 

Singer 301, Green Instruction Manual, Singer Buttonholer, Singer Machine Attachments,

Centennial 1851-1951 Singercraft Guide, Foot Pedal and New Singer Owner Pamphlet

 

Queen Ann #40 Cabinet with Stool / Sewing Chest 4 Drawer / 1951

 

Limited Edition Singer 301

I was lucky to purchase this from a Singer employee for my collection!

 

This Limited Edition Singer 301, NA005958 with new 1951 Black Badge, was awarded to an employee with over 40 years of service to the Singer Manufacturing Company and to commemorate the company's Centennial Year of 1951. It came with a Sterling Silver 100th Anniversary Singer Centennial Medal, Centennial Singercraft Guide, Grass Cloth Trapezoid Case, Green Cover Instruction Manual and all Accessories. It is a condition Grade 9, almost like the day it left the factory.

 

40 Years of Service Employee Award!

 

Super-Rare

Singer 301 Service Award Pin

Singer Model 301 Service Award Pin

This is a Super-Rare Singer Model 301 Service Award Pin 1/20 10K GF. The area on the bottom is to engrave the employees name and other information. Very nice collectable item and only two are known to exist today.

 

Other Singer Sewing Machines in my Collection

 

Centennial Singer 201

  

Of course I had to have a Centennial Singer 201. The Model 201 shows the originality of the traditional sewing machine prior to the sewing machine-of-tomorrow, the Singer 301. Condition Grade 9.

 

Singer Model 221 Featherweight 

I also have a 221 Featherweight custom painted that I purchased for my daughter. All girls need a sewing machine and this one made a perfect Christmas gift.

 

Singer Toy Series - Class 20

Finally, the Singer Toy Series - Class 20. I have several dating from the 1910's to 1950's. They are cute and make wonderful decoration items. This one is special because it has the Singer 301 trapezoid case.

 

 

Other Singer Items from my Collection!

Vintage Retro Singer Model 301 Sewing Hinged Tin: made by Tin Box Company to store accessories, bobbins, thread spools, anything you want. Nice original retro image of the 1952 advertisement.

 

 

Singer Sewing Machines Vintage Images Retro Collectable Tin Hinged: made by McCall, this Singer sewing tin has all the collectable 1950's vintage images around the tin box but most importantly is the largest image of a Singer 301 from the 1952 advertisement.

 

Singer Sewing Machine Double Tin Truck: made by Bristolware, this Singer sewing double tin opens on the top and the front engine area for storage. It is a retro of the 1950 Morris Z Van made in Britain.

 

 

Centennial Singercraft Guide, #121079: Only issued during the Singer Centennial Year 1951. The guide itself is not marked with any number. It was a Special Edition of the Singercraft Guides and is the only #2 guide to have the design presented upside down as you sew. It was the very last Singercraft guide made. Discontinued in 1951

 

 

Centennial tape Measure: this is "A Century of Sewing Service" "1851-1951" tape measure. Very nice item to go with a Limited Edition or Centennial Singer 301.

 

 

Singer Centennial Medal: during the Centennial Year Singer presented to Employees a Sterling Silver 100th Anniversary Singer Centennial Medal. They are pretty hard to find but a very nice Centennial Collectors item.

 

Singer Teacher's Textbook of Machine Sewing: This nice to have book shows how to use all your Singer sewing machine attachments. It also covers most of the vintage sewing machines and especially the Singer 301. Threading diagrams, cleaning and oiling. This book is filled with information. Copyright 1953 with the Singer 301 image on the front cover.

 

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